Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

The Isle of Man Legislation is undergoing a review this year, which will naturally include the ICAO SARPs.

Following the review, any proposed changes to our legislation will be available for consultation.

If the Registry decides to adopt the guidance included in Appendix 2.3 of Annex 6 Part II regarding the underwater locating device of a non-deployable flight recorder operating for a minimum of ninety days, any new regulation will include a suitable timeframe to allow operators to comply with the requirement.

The IOMAR issues CofA and CofR in electronic/digital form, therefore they are the original version. (If the CofA or CofR is printed from the digital file, the printed copy is not the original. However, hard copy certificates are available from IOMAR on request.) 


ICAO does not specific the medium in which the certificates must be issued, they only state that the certificate is the original. In the days when the certificates were produced on typewriters, the typed copy was the original. Almost all certificates are now produced electronically, the electronic/digital certificates are technically the original.

At present there are no flight data monitoring requirements in the IOM civil aviation legislation for M-reg aircraft.

Information regarding when FDR/CVR should be used and the preservation thereof can be found under Air Navigation (Isle of Man) Order 2015, Part 16 Section 86 and 87 respectively. This document also lists the required equipment in Schedule 3 on page 89 and scale P and S (page 104/5) and this may be relevant for you.

Further information can be obtained from Registry Publication 9 Airworthiness Management Information, section 5 refers to CVR/FDR calibration and readout.

An operator of a large and turbojet aircraft must comply with the requirements of Part 17A of the Air Navigation (Isle of Man) Order 2015 as amended.

Articles 99B requires the operator to have a Company Operations Manual (COM), including a Safety Management System (SMS), Article 99E to implement a Fatigue Risk Management Programme (FRMP), and Article 99I to have a Maintenance Control Manual (MCM).

The Registry will not approve the COM or MCM so do not need to be submitted to the Registry; but may be requested by us at some time in the future in the event of an occurrence or incident investigation by the Registry or as part of the IOMARs safety oversight programme.

To assist Operators in preparing the Company Operations Manual and accompanying Maintenance Control Manual, the Registry has produced a Company Operations Manual Template and Maintenance Control Manual Assistance document, please refer to RP 56.

It is important to note that the SMS and FRMP are proportionate and relevant to size, complexity and scope of the operation of the aircraft.

In order to comply with the IOM Legislation, these must be in place before any flight.

The Isle of Man national requirements do not require a contrasting line around the emergency exit door on the aircraft M-XXXX, Aircraft type, serial number:XXXX

The IOMAR is aware that some manufacturers do include this requirement within the aircraft TCDS.

Consequently if this is contained within the Aircraft type EASA/FAA/TC/ANAC TCDS, and as all items within the TCDS must be complied with, then this will need to be actioned in accordance with the relevant EASA/FAA/TC/ANAC Certification Specification (CS 23- small aircraft) or (CS 25- large aircraft).

Article 99E of the Air Navigation (Isle of Man) Order 2015 as amended, requires an Operator to establish and implement a fatigue risk management programme that ensures that personnel involved in the operation and maintenance of aircraft do not carry out their duties when fatigued. This varies from the ICAO requirement in that it does not state ‘operator personnel’ but only ‘personnel’.

The IOM Aircraft Registry’s policy in this particular context is that the word ‘personnel’ is limited to personnel directly employed by the International GA Operator and is not intended to included personnel employed by organisations that the operator has contracted with to perform operational and maintenance functions. However, operators are responsible for managing risks to their operations, and may address the issue of fatigue of contractor personnel, as part of their normal SMS activities.

The link below will access the IBAC/ICAO/Flight Safety Foundation ‘Fatigue Management Guide for General Aviation Operators of Large and Turbojet Aeroplanes’ which has been published to provide general aviation aeroplane operators with information on the nature of fatigue and guidance on managing the risks related to this hazard within a general aviation operators’ safety management system.

https://flightsafety.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/FM-for-GA-Ops-FINAL.pdf

There is no requirement under Isle of Man civil aviation legislation for an operator of an ‘M’ registered aircraft to have a Flight Data Analysis programme.

The IOM Aircraft Registry do not approve the operations manual (OM) (which of course will incorporate the fatigue risk management programme as per Article 99E (2) of the Air Navigation (Isle of Man) Order 2015 as amended). It is the operators’ responsibility to ensure the OM meets both the regulatory requirements and the specific needs of their operation.

We reserve the right to request a copy or part thereof of the Operations Manual and/or any other of the operator’s flight operational documentation as part of our continuing oversight monitoring programme or in the case of a specific event involving the aircraft.

The Isle of Man regulatrory requirements on flight time and duty time are contained in the Air Navigation (Isle of Man) Order 2015:
Fatigue of crew – responsibilities of crew
81.—(1) A person must not act as a member of the crew of an aircraft registered in the Isle of Man if the person know or suspect that he or she is suffering from or, having regard to the circumstances of the flight to be undertaken, is likely to suffer from, such fatigue as may endanger the safety of the aircraft or of its occupants.
(2) A person must not act as a member of the flight crew of an aircraft to which this article applies without first ensuring that the operator of the aircraft is aware of the person’s flight times during the period of 28 days preceding the flight.

Flight times – responsibilities of flight crew
82.—(1) Subject to paragraphs (2) and (3), a person must not act as a member of the flight crew of an aircraft registered in the Isle of Man if, at the beginning of the flight, the aggregate of all that person’s previous flight times—
(a) during the period of 28 consecutive days expiring at the end of the day on which the flight begins exceeds 100 hours; or
(b) during the period of twelve months expiring at the end of the previous month exceeds 900 hours.
(2) This article does not apply to a flight that is a private flight in an aircraft that has a maximum total mass authorised of not more than 1600 kg.
(3) A person may act as a member of the flight crew on a private or aerial work flight where the operator does not hold a national air operator’s certificate if, at the time when the flight begins, the aggregate of all the flight times of the member of the flight crew concerned since last being medically examined and found fit is not more than 25 hours.

and also the 2016 amendment: (applicable to operators of ‘M’ registered large and turbojet aircraft)

Fatigue risk management programme
99E.—(1) The operator of an aircraft must establish and implement a fatigue risk management programme that ensures that personnel involved in the operation and
maintenance of aircraft do not carry out their duties when fatigued.
(2) The operator must include the programme in the company operations manual in respect of the aircraft.

Please refer to Industry Notice 020 which clarifies the scope of applicability for fatigue risk management programmes.

IBAC/ICAO/Flight Safety Foundation ‘Fatigue Management Guide for General Aviation Operators of Large and Turbojet Aeroplanes’ has been published to provide general aviation aeroplane operators with information on the nature of fatigue and guidance on managing the risks related to this hazard within a general aviation operators’ safety management system. The guide can be accessed via this link https://flightsafety.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/FM-for-GA-Ops-FINAL.pdf.

In terms of the SELCAL code, an application form will need to be completed on behalf of the aircraft and sent to ASRI, (Aviation Spectrum Resources Inc,). They function as the International SELCAL Registrar on behalf of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). This includes responsibility for the worldwide assignment of SELCAL codes and management of the SELCAL database. The link below will take you to the ASRI web page where you can complete and send off an application form for a SELCAL code.

https://www.asri.aero/

The IOMAR does not have a policy or any specific regulation prohibiting the operation of an ‘M’ registered aircraft using a paperless cockpit.

At the point of dispatch a minimum of 2 sources of terminal/approach charts must be available together with at least one of all other required aircraft documents.


5.3.4.1 Changes to or Addition to Existing EFB
Where an operator requires to change or add to the existing EFB Class, approval is required from the Isle of Man Aircraft Registry as per an initial application. Approval is not required for any routine changes to a current EFB system; however, the Operator should update the Operational Risk Assessment (see 5.3.6.1) and document the results in accordance with their own Safety Management System requirements (see 5.3.7.2). It should be noted that operating system and database updates are not considered to be changes but instead should be managed, controlled and tested as part of the ongoing EFB operation.

For your information, the links below will open the current form 91, Application for Approval of an EFB System and RP4, Guidance to Operators – Operating Approvals and Renewals (specifically Chapter 5.3, EFB).

https://www.iomaircraftregistry.com/media/1314/f91-efb-application.pdf

https://www.iomaircraftregistry.com/media/1163/rp4-operating-approvals.pdf


I trust this is helpful to you, but please do not hesitate to contact the Registry if you require further clarification or information.

Yes, fully integrated eCharts, performance calculations and also weight and balance calculation functions are considered as Class 3 EFB and when used operationally they require approval for use on an M-Reg aircraft. Visit our EFB page for more information.  

Subject -Base training: Isle of Man registered aircraft. The pilot under training (PUT) must be currently/due to be employed by the owner/operator of the aircraft. All base training must be conducted with a fully constituted crew as required by the AFM/RFM.  The fully constituted crew must hold appropriate type rating and be validated by the IOM to operate the aircraft.  The pilot in command must also hold a type rating instructor (TRI) privilege (and in the case of an EASA TRI, under the control of an appropriately approved ATO).  Once the base training has been successfully completed by the PUT and the type rating added to their licence, a flight crew licence validation can then be applied for from the IOMAR.We would suggest that you notify the authority in whose airspace the training will take place to confirm that they have no objection to the flights. In addition, the operator should confirm with their insurance company that their policy covers the use of the aircraft for the base training to be carried out.I trust this is of assistance to you, but please do not hesitate to contact us should you require further clarification or questions on this subject.I trust this is of assistance to you, but please do not hesitate to contact us should you require further clarification or questions on this subject.

Yes, Scale W in the Air Navigation (Isle of Man) Order as amended (ANO) applies to all aircraft flying over 49,000ft.
The requirements for protecting air crew from cosmic radiation are contained in Article 83 of the ANO.
The requirements for monitoring and recording cosmic radiation are contained in Article 85 of the ANO.

Please note that the ANO will be undergoing a review against the ICAO SARPS and the requirements for cosmic radiation monitoring equipment may change in the new legislation. The new ANO will be subject to consultation at the appropriate time.

“Scale W
(1) Subject to paragraph (2), cosmic radiation detection equipment calibrated in millirems per hour and capable of indicating the action and alert levels of radiation dose rate.
(2) An aircraft is not required to carry the equipment if—
(a) before take-off the equipment is found to be unserviceable and it is not reasonably practicable to repair or replace it at the aerodrome of departure;
and
(b) the radiation forecast available to the commander of the aircraft indicates that hazardous radiation conditions are unlikely to be encountered by the aircraft on its intended route or any planned diversion from that route. “

Yes, the Company Operations Manual (COM), Maintenance Control Manual (MCM) and Journey Log (Tech Log) must be in the name of the operator and not the management company (if applicable).
Where a management company serves multiple operators with a single COM, MCM etc. please contact the Registry to discuss.