Large & Turbojet Aircraft

What is a Large & Turbojet Aircraft?

Part 17a of The Air Navigation (Isle of Man) Order 2015 (as amended) defines 'Large and Turbojet aircraft' that has any of the following characteristics:

  • a maximum total mass authorised exceeding 5,700 kg;
  • one or more turbojet engines; or
  • a seating configuration of more than nine passenger seats.

 

What any the additional regulatory requirement for a large and turbojet aircraft on the M- Register?

A large and turbojet aircraft on the M- register must have all of the following:

  • Company Operations Manual (COM);
  • Safety Management System (SMS);
  • Maintenance Control Manual (MCM);
  • Fatigue Risk Management Programme (FRMP); and
  • Minimum Equipment List (MEL) (approved by the Registry)

 

Further guidance on the above requirements can be found below.

The operator of an aircraft must prepare and ensure that a Company Operations Manual (COM) is in force in respect of the aircraft.

The manual must include the items listed in Part 17a 99B of the ANO(IOM) 2015 (as amended), see page 71-2.

Any one of the following formats is acceptable to the Registry:

  1. Based on Registry Publication 56a Company Operations Manual Template (request a copy by email [email protected]);
  2. Using the Operators existing generic (no reference to a specific National Authority) COM;
  3. Using the Operators existing COM, with a separate 'differences' appendix for M-registered aircraft clearly stating compliance to IOM regulations and flights operations for private or corporate use only;

The operator of an aircraft must ensure that a reference to an operator’s maintenance control manual developed in accordance with industry codes of practice is included in the company operations manual.

The manual must contain information about—

  • the operator’s maintenance responsibilities;
  • the means of recording names and positions of maintenance personnel;
  • the maintenance programme;
  • the methods used for the completion and retention of maintenance records;
  • the procedures for ensuring that appropriate information, including any amendment to the maintenance programme, is disseminated to others;
  • the procedures for implementing action required following the receipt of mandatory continuing airworthiness information;
  • a system of analysis and continued monitoring of the performance and efficiency of the maintenance programme in order to correct identified deficiencies;
  • the aircraft types and models to which the manual applies;
  • procedures for ensuring that any unserviceability affecting an aircraft’s airworthiness is recorded and rectified; and
  • the procedures for advising the Department of significant in-service occurrences.

The manual may be issued in parts.

The design of the manual must take account of human factors.

 

The operator of an aircraft must establish and implement a fatigue risk management programme that ensures that personnel involved in the operation and maintenance of aircraft do not carry out their duties when fatigued.

The operator must include the programme in the company operations manual in respect of the aircraft.

Article 99E of the Air Navigation (Isle of Man) Order 2015 as amended, requires an Operator to establish and implement a fatigue risk management programme that ensures that personnel involved in the operation and maintenance of aircraft do not carry out their duties when fatigued. This varies from the ICAO requirement in that it does not state ‘operator personnel’ but only ‘personnel’.

The IOM Aircraft Registry’s policy in this particular context is that the word ‘personnel’ is limited to personnel directly employed by the International GA Operator and is not intended to included personnel employed by organisations that the operator has contracted with to perform operational and maintenance functions. However, operators are responsible for managing risks to their operations, and may address the issue of fatigue of contractor personnel, as part of their normal SMS activities.

The IBAC/ICAO/Flight Safety Foundation ‘Fatigue Management Guide for General Aviation Operators of Large and Turbojet Aeroplanes’ has been published to provide general aviation aeroplane operators with information on the nature of fatigue and guidance on managing the risks related to this hazard within a general aviation operators’ safety management system.

 

The operator of an aircraft of a type that has a master minimum equipment list established must—

  • prepare and ensure that a minimum equipment list for the aircraft is approved by the Department; and
  • include the details of the minimum equipment list procedures in the company operations manual.

The operator of an aircraft must ensure that checklists are used by the flight crew of the aircraft prior to, during and after all phases of its operations, and in emergencies, all as detailed in the aircraft’s operations manual.

The operator must ensure that the design and utilisation of checklists takes into account human factors.

The commander of the aircraft must ensure that the checklists are fully complied with.

The operator of an aircraft must specify, for flights that are to be conducted in accordance with the instrument flight rules, the method of establishing terrain clearance altitudes.

The operator of an aircraft must—

(a) ensure, in accordance with procedures acceptable to the Department, that—

  • the aircraft is maintained to an airworthy condition;
  • the operational and emergency equipment necessary for an intended flight is serviceable; and
  • the certificate of airworthiness of the aeroplane remains valid;

(b) not operate the aircraft unless it is maintained and released to service under a system acceptable to the Department;

(c) ensure that if the maintenance release is not issued by an approved maintenance organisation in accordance with paragraph 8.7 of Part 1 of Annex 6 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation11, the person signing the maintenance release—

  • is licensed in accordance with Annex 1 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation12;
  • is a person whose licence has been validated by the Department; or,
  • in a particular case, is an individual authorised by the Department; and

(d) ensure that the maintenance of the aircraft is performed in accordance with a maintenance programme approved by the Department.

The operator of an aircraft must ensure that maintenance personnel in respect of the aircraft receive initial and continuation training as required by and acceptable to the Department, being training appropriate to their assigned tasks and responsibilities.

The operator of an aircraft must designate a pilot to act as pilot in command for each flight the aircraft makes.

This article applies to an aircraft that has been involved in an accident or incident.

The owner of the aircraft, or if it is leased its lessee, must in so far as is possible to do so—

  • preserve the related flight data recorder records and cockpit voice recorder records of the aircraft and, if necessary the associated flight recorders and voice recorders; and
  • retain them in safe custody pending their disposal as determined in accordance with ICAO Annex 13.

 

The operator of an aircraft must—

  • based on the aircraft’s seating capacity or the number of passengers carried by it, determine the number of cabin crew required to effect a safe and expeditious evacuation of the aircraft; and
  • determine and assign the functions to be performed by each member of the cabin crew in an emergency or a situation requiring an emergency evacuation of the aircraft.

The operator of an aircraft must ensure that a training programme is established and is completed by each person before being assigned as a member of the cabin crew on the aircraft.

The operator must ensure that the syllabus for the training programme is referenced in the company operations manual and includes training in human factors.

Flight crew members required to be on flight deck duty on a flight in an aircraft must communicate through boom microphones when the aircraft is below the transition level or transition altitude.